Indigo

By Emily Short

I must say I only managed to finish this with the help of a friend. Despite that, I suspect the puzzles aren’t meant to be too difficult.

This game is one in the series of Emily Short’s games based on fairy tales (the others including Bronze and Glass). In this game, you are Rapunzel, or some version of her, and you are attempting to get out of your tower. There is a in-game device key to progressing in the plot, which is broadly hinted at using textual clues. Once you figure that out, the puzzles should all be fairly straightforward; I took about twenty minutes on Indigo. There is really little I can say without spoiling it. What I can say, however, is read everything carefully, including and <em>especially</em> the introduction.

There is, however, a very very intriguing epilogue which hints to the backstory of the PC which still has me scratching my head.

Holography

By Emily Short (Inkle; play here)

In the truest sense of ‘choose your own adventure’, Holography starts with a simple statement: The king died and then the queen died of grief. You can then choose an explanation for the situation, which alters the text to reflect the new reality you chose, and another choice presents itself, and so on… The level of branching creates a multitude of unique stories, some hinting at court intrigues, some poignant. Simply done, and enjoyable for what appears to be a demo for the inkle system.

Indigo

By Emily Short

Having finally finished this (with some hints from a friend), I am now fully equipped to write my impressions of this game.

This game is one in the series of Emily Short’s games based on fairy tales (the others including Bronze and Glass). In this game, you are Rapunzel, or some version of her, and you are attempting to get out of your tower. There is a in-game device key to progressing in the plot, which is broadly hinted at using textual clues. Once you figure that out, the puzzles should all be fairly straightforward; I took about twenty minutes on Indigo. There is really little I can say without spoiling it. What I can say, however, is read everything carefully, including and especially the introduction.

There is, however, a very very intriguing epilogue which hints to the backstory of the PC which still has me scratching my head.

A Dark and Stormy Entry

A Dark and Stormy Entry

I didn’t realise this was by Emily Short! But it is. Though the copyright is to Lord Lobur-Bytton.

It’s an IF about writer’s block (like loads of others [like Violet]), but what makes it slightly different is that it is written rather in a CYOA (Choose Your Own Adventure) style. One doesn’t input commands, one inputs choices. There are several endings for about 3-4 choices, making it a very, very short game, but entertaining nonetheless.